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Journal J Hist Neurosci

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Sectorization of the hippocampal formation: Cytoarchitectonics, topography, or vulnerability to hypoxia?

Régis Olry,

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, :1-6]

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A brief history of the Australasian Neuroscience Society.

Wickliffe C Abraham, Laurence B Geffen, Elspeth M McLachlan, Linda J Richards, John A P Rostas,

The collective efforts of Australasian neuroscientists over the past 50 years to forge a binational presence are reviewed in this article. The events in the 1970s leading to the formation of an informal Australian Neurosciences Society are discussed in the context of the international emergence of neuroscience as an interdisciplinary science. ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, :1-14]

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Did King Yeongjo (1694-1776) of Joseon Dynasty Korea suffer dementia during the last decade of his reign?

Changhoon Gong, Kunwoo Park,

King Yeongjo, the 21st king of Joseon (18th Century Korea), reigned during the prime years of the dynasty and was its oldest king. Despite his many accomplishments, debate surrounds his reputed display of the symptoms of dementia during the last years of his life.  The King showed signs of dementia ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(4):425-435]

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George Kenneth York III.

David A Steinberg,

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(4):436-437]

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Correction.

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(4):445]

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René Cruchet (1875-1959), beyond encephalitis lethargica.

Olivier Walusinski,

René Cruchet (1875-1959) was a pediatrician from Bordeaux known for his seminal description of encephalitis lethargica during World War I, at the same time as Constantin von Economo (1876-1931) in Vienna published his own description, which, unlike Cruchet's description, provided precious anatomopathological data in addition to the clinical data. Cruchet ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, :1-19]

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Lytico-bodig in Guam: Historical links between diet and illness during and after Spanish colonization.

Santiago Giménez-Roldán, John C Steele, Valerie S Palmer, Peter S Spencer,

This paper analyses documents on health and disease among Chamorro people during and after 333 years (1565-1898) of the Spanish claim to and occupation of Guam. Here, a complex neurodegenerative disease-known locally as <i>lytico-bodig</i> and medically as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS/PDC)-reached hyperendemic proportions in the mid-twentieth century but then declined ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(4):335-374]

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On the English (1931) and Spanish (1932) translations of von Economo's classic monograph on encephalitis lethargica.

Lazaros C Triarhou,

The "second" seminal monograph by Constantin von Economo on encephalitis lethargica appeared in print in German in 1929, following his initial report of the disease (eponymously associated with his name) before the Viennese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology and the publication of his "first" monograph on the subject in 1917. ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, :1-15]

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On old Olympus? Oliver Wendell Holmes and the origin and evolution of a mnemonic couplet for the cranial nerves.

Douglas J Lanska,

A mnemonic couplet to help students learn the names of the cranial nerves has been in use in the United States since the mid-nineteenthth century. The original in iambic tetrameter is attributed to Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. Using a systematic search, more than 40 variants have been identified and, where ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, :1-10]

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Neuroscience history interview with Professor Wolf Singer, emeritus director at the Department of Neurophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt am Main.

Wolf Singer, Sascha Topp,

Dr. Wolf Singer (b. 1943) is one of Germany's most renowned brain researchers and neurophysiologists. His accomplishments in the creation of new research centers for neuroscience as well as his commitment to European scientific organizations for integrative brain research are highly valued as significant moments of advancement in the neurosciences. ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, :1-25]

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Neuroscience history interview with Professor Bert Sakmann, Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine (1991), Max Planck Society, Germany.

Bert Sakmann, Frank W Stahnisch,

Dr. Bert Sakmann (b. 1942) studied at the Universities of Tuebingen, Freiburg, Berlin, Paris, and Munich, graduating in 1967. Much of his professional life has been spent in various institutes of the Max Planck Society. In 1971, a British Council Fellowship took him to the Department of Biophysics of University ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, :1-20]

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Contextualizing ovarian pain in the late 19th century-Part 1: Women with "hysteria" and "hystero-epilepsy".

John Jarrell, Frank W Stahnisch,

"Hysteria" and "hystero-epilepsy" were common medical diagnoses among physicians during the nineteenth century. In Paris, <i>L'Hôpital de la Salpêtrière</i>-originally a hospice for the poor and a prison for prostitutes and other female inmates-became a center of great interest for the possible role of neurological diseases in these conditions. At the ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(3):315-328]

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Contextualizing ovarian pain in the late 19th century - Part 2: Ovarian-based treatments of "hysteria".

John Jarrell, Frank W Stahnisch,

The peculiar therapeutic practice of "ovarian compression"-paradoxically, both in initiating and in terminating hysterical activity-remains largely unexplained territory from both historical and medical perspectives. The gynecological indications of "hysteria" and "hystero-epilepsy" are now considered to be among similar questionable indications as contemporaneous "nymphomania" and "epilepsy." This article analyzes historical clinical ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(4):375-389]

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The memory for words: Armand Trousseau on aphasia.

Richard Leblanc,

Of all the nineteenth-century physicians whose names still resonate today, Armand Trousseau is perhaps the one most familiar, for his description of carpal spasm as a sign of hypocalcemia (Trousseau's sign) and his description of the hypercoagulable state associated with cancer (Trousseau's syndrome). In the last three years of his ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, :1-19]

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The vision of Helmholtz.

Nicholas J Wade,

Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (1821-1894) began investigating vision at a time when its study was undergoing a revolution. Laboratory experiments were augmenting the long history of naturalistic observations. Instruments of stimulus control enabled the manipulation of time and space in ways that had not been possible previously, and Helmholtz ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(4):405-424]

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The great family of cerebral ventricles: Some intruders in the portrait gallery.

Richard Leblanc,

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(4):438-440]

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Raymond D. Adams and Joseph M. Foley: Elaborating the neurologic manifestations of hepatic encephalopathy (1949-1953).

Douglas J Lanska,

This article compares and contrasts different versions of the pioneering work Raymond Adams and Joseph Foley concerning the neurological and neurophysiological manifestations of liver disease. These versions were presented by the protagonists in publications from 1949 to 1953, and later in various oral histories conducted separately from 1988 to 2014. ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(4):390-404]

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In memoriam: Henry Szczȩsny Schutta, MD (1928-2020).

Douglas J Lanska,

Polish-American neurologist and neurologic historian Henry Szczȩsny Schutta, MB BS, MD (1928-2020), was born in the Free City of Gdańsk. After surviving the trauma and devastation wrought on his family and his native country during World War II, Schutta met the love of his life in war-torn Bonn, Germany. Schutta ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(2):185-206]

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Neuroanniversary 2022.

Paul Eling,

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, :1-7]

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Wilhelm Erb (1840-1921), an influential German founder of neurology in the nineteenth century.

Bernd Holdorff,

As an internist, Wilhelm Erb (1840-1921) developed neurology (he also used the term "neuropathology" synonymously) in the tradition of his teacher, Nikolaus Friedreich, in Heidelberg. He left behind a huge corpus of semiological and nosological elements that now constitute our current knowledge of neurology, much more than just the eponyms ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(3):300-314]

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The perversion of language: Jules Baillarger on aphasia, the lateralization of speech, and the Baillarger-Jackson principle.

Richard Leblanc,

Jules Baillarger was one of the foremost figures of nineteenth-century neurobiology. He is remembered today for his discovery that the human cerebral cortex is composed of six intercalated layers. Even today, two horizontal fiber bundles within cortical layers IV and V are referred to as the outer and inner bands ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(3):277-299]

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Western European influence on the development of Russian neurology and psychiatry, part 1: Western European tours of early Russian neurologists and psychiatrists.

Evgenia L Panova, Douglas J Lanska,

Beginning in the 1860s, two major centers of neurology and psychiatry arose in Russia: Imperial Moscow University (IMU) and Imperial Medical and Surgical Academy in St. Petersburg (IMSA). Both centers were strongly influenced by Leading Western European schools and specialists, through the clinical and research training regimes of both Russian ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(3):223-251]

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Encephalitis lethargica in Peru.

Santiago Stucchi-Portocarrero, Miguel Humberto Tomas-Miranda,

Encephalitis lethargica first appeared during World War 1, but reported cases gradually faded over the 1920s, and in the years following, cases were only sporadically reported. The clinical presentation was heterogeneous and typically included both acute and chronic phases. The acute phase was characterized by excessive sleepiness, disorders of ocular ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(3):264-276]

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Urinary paraplegia and William Withey Gull.

Mervyn Eadie,

In 1833, Edward Stanley described the autopsy findings in seven men with paraplegia but no visible spinal cord abnormality. All had upper urinary tract infections. Stanley suggested that a nerve-transmitted input from the kidneys could suppress function in the spinal cord, causing paralysis. Others-principally Leroy d'Etiolles (1856) and Brown-Séquard (1859-1862)-expanded ... Read more >>

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(3):252-263]

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The great family of cerebral ventricles: Some intruders in the portrait gallery.

Régis Olry, Duane E Haines,

J Hist Neurosci (Journal of the history of the neurosciences)
[2021, 30(2):207-213]

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