Full Text Journal Articles by
Author Michel Chapuisat

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Putative determinants of virulence in Melissococcus plutonius, the bacterial agent causing European foulbrood in honey bees.

Daniela Grossar, Verena Kilchenmann, Eva Forsgren, Jean-Daniel Charrière, Laurent Gauthier, Michel Chapuisat, Vincent Dietemann,

MELISSOCOCCUS PLUTONIUS:is a bacterial pathogen that causes epidemic outbreaks of European foulbrood (EFB) in honey bee populations. The pathogenicity of a bacterium depends on its virulence, and understanding the mechanisms influencing virulence may allow for improved disease control and containment. Using a standardized in vitro assay, we demonstrate that virulence ... Read more >>

Virulence (Virulence)
[2020, 11(1):554-567]

Cited: 0 times

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An Ancient and Eroded Social Supergene Is Widespread across Formica Ants.

Alan Brelsford, Jessica Purcell, Amaury Avril, Patrick Tran Van, Junxia Zhang, Timothée Brütsch, Liselotte Sundström, Heikki Helanterä, Michel Chapuisat,

Supergenes, clusters of tightly linked genes, play a key role in the evolution of complex adaptive variation [1, 2]. Although supergenes have been identified in many species, we lack an understanding of their origin, evolution, and persistence [3]. Here, we uncover 20-40 Ma of evolutionary history of a supergene associated ... Read more >>

Curr. Biol. (Current biology : CB)
[2020, 30(2):304-311.e4]

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Winter is coming: harsh environments limit independent reproduction of cooperative-breeding queens in a socially polymorphic ant.

Ornela De Gasperin, Pierre Blacher, Guglielmo Grasso, Michel Chapuisat,

Cooperative breeding animals frequently inhabit harsh environments. It is widely accepted that harsh environments hinder independent reproduction, and this constraint maintains individuals in family groups. Yet the assumption that harsh ecological conditions reduce the success of members of cooperative breeding groups when breeding independently has not been experimentally tested. We ... Read more >>

Biol. Lett. (Biology letters)
[2020, 16(1):20190730]

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No mate preference associated with the supergene controlling social organization in Alpine silver ants.

Amaury Avril, Sacha Zahnd, Jelisaveta Djordjevic, Michel Chapuisat,

Disassortative mating is a powerful mechanism stabilizing polymorphisms at sex chromosomes and other supergenes. The Alpine silver ant, Formica selysi, has two forms of social organization-single-queen and multiple-queen colonies-determined by alternate haplotypes at a large supergene. Here, we explore whether mate preference contributes to the maintenance of the genetic polymorphism ... Read more >>

J. Evol. Biol. (Journal of evolutionary biology)
[2019, 32(7):742-748]

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Asymmetric assortative mating and queen polyandry are linked to a supergene controlling ant social organization.

Amaury Avril, Jessica Purcell, Alan Brelsford, Michel Chapuisat,

Nonrecombining genomic variants underlie spectacular social polymorphisms, from bird mating systems to ant social organization. Because these "social supergenes" affect multiple phenotypic traits linked to survival and reproduction, explaining their persistence remains a substantial challenge. Here, we investigate how large nonrecombining genomic variants relate to colony social organization, mating system ... Read more >>

Mol. Ecol. (Molecular ecology)
[2019, 28(6):1428-1438]

Cited: 1 time

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Ants exhibit asymmetric hybridization in a mosaic hybrid zone.

Jessica Purcell, Sacha Zahnd, Anouk Athanasiades, Rebecca Türler, Michel Chapuisat, Alan Brelsford,

Research on hybridization between species provides unparalleled insights into the pre- and postzygotic isolating mechanisms that drive speciation. In social organisms, colony-level incompatibilities may provide additional reproductive barriers not present in solitary species, and hybrid zones offer an opportunity to identify these barriers. Here, we use genotyping-by-sequencing to sequence hundreds ... Read more >>

Mol. Ecol. (Molecular ecology)
[2016, 25(19):4866-4874]

Cited: 4 times

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Ant workers exhibit specialization and memory during raft formation.

Amaury Avril, Jessica Purcell, Michel Chapuisat,

By working together, social insects achieve tasks that are beyond the reach of single individuals. A striking example of collective behaviour is self-assembly, a process in which individuals link their bodies together to form structures such as chains, ladders, walls or rafts. To get insight into how individual behavioural variation ... Read more >>

Naturwissenschaften (Die Naturwissenschaften)
[2016, 103(5-6):36]

Cited: 1 time

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No Evidence for Moral Reward and Punishment in an Anonymous Context.

Christine Clavien, Danielle P Mersch, Michel Chapuisat,

Human social interactions are regulated by moral norms that define individual obligations and rights. These norms are enforced by punishment of transgressors and reward of followers. Yet, the generality and strength of this drive to punish or reward is unclear, especially when people are not personally involved in the situation ... Read more >>

PLoS ONE (PloS one)
[2016, 11(3):e0150388]

Cited: 0 times

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The evolution of utility functions and psychological altruism.

Christine Clavien, Michel Chapuisat,

Numerous studies show that humans tend to be more cooperative than expected given the assumption that they are rational maximizers of personal gain. As a result, theoreticians have proposed elaborated formal representations of human decision-making, in which utility functions including "altruistic" or "moral" preferences replace the purely self-oriented "Homo economicus" ... Read more >>

Stud Hist Philos Biol Biomed Sci (Studies in history and philosophy of biological and biomedical sciences)
[2016, 56:24-31]

Cited: 0 times

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Social structure varies with elevation in an Alpine ant.

Jessica Purcell, Loïc Pellissier, Michel Chapuisat,

Insect societies vary greatly in social organization, yet the relative roles of ecological and genetic factors in driving this variation remain poorly understood. Identifying how social structure varies along environmental gradients can provide insights into the ecological conditions favouring alternative social organizations. Here, we investigate how queen number variation is ... Read more >>

Mol. Ecol. (Molecular ecology)
[2015, 24(2):498-507]

Cited: 6 times

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Transitions in social complexity along elevational gradients reveal a combined impact of season length and development time on social evolution.

Sarah D Kocher, Loïc Pellissier, Carl Veller, Jessica Purcell, Martin A Nowak, Michel Chapuisat, Naomi E Pierce,

Eusociality is taxonomically rare, yet associated with great ecological success. Surprisingly, studies of environmental conditions favouring eusociality are often contradictory. Harsh conditions associated with increasing altitude and latitude seem to favour increased sociality in bumblebees and ants, but the reverse pattern is found in halictid bees and polistine wasps. Here, ... Read more >>

Proc. Biol. Sci. (Proceedings. Biological sciences)
[2014, 281(1787):]

Cited: 12 times

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Foster carers influence brood pathogen resistance in ants.

Jessica Purcell, Michel Chapuisat,

Social organisms face a high risk of epidemics, and respond to this threat by combining efficient individual and collective defences against pathogens. An intriguing and little studied feature of social animals is that individual pathogen resistance may depend not only on genetic or maternal factors, but also on the social ... Read more >>

Proc. Biol. Sci. (Proceedings. Biological sciences)
[2014, 281(1792):]

Cited: 1 time

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Convergent genetic architecture underlies social organization in ants.

Jessica Purcell, Alan Brelsford, Yannick Wurm, Nicolas Perrin, Michel Chapuisat,

Complex adaptive polymorphisms are common in nature, but what mechanisms maintain the underlying favorable allelic combinations? The convergent evolution of polymorphic social organization in two independent ant species provides a great opportunity to investigate how genomes evolved under parallel selection. Here, we demonstrate that a large, nonrecombining "social chromosome" is ... Read more >>

Curr. Biol. (Current biology : CB)
[2014, 24(22):2728-2732]

Cited: 35 times

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Ant brood function as life preservers during floods.

Jessica Purcell, Amaury Avril, Geoffrey Jaffuel, Sarah Bates, Michel Chapuisat,

Social organisms can surmount many ecological challenges by working collectively. An impressive example of such collective behavior occurs when ants physically link together into floating 'rafts' to escape from flooded habitat. However, raft formation may represent a social dilemma, with some positions posing greater individual risks than others. Here, we ... Read more >>

PLoS ONE (PloS one)
[2014, 9(2):e89211]

Cited: 1 time

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Immune priming and pathogen resistance in ant queens.

Dumas Gálvez, Michel Chapuisat,

Growing empirical evidence indicates that invertebrates become more resistant to a pathogen following initial exposure to a nonlethal dose; yet the generality, mechanisms, and adaptive value of such immune priming are still under debate. Because life-history theory predicts that immune priming and large investment in immunity should be more frequent ... Read more >>

Ecol Evol (Ecology and evolution)
[2014, 4(10):1761-1767]

Cited: 10 times

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Evolution. Smells like queen since the Cretaceous.

Michel Chapuisat,

Science (Science (New York, N.Y.))
[2014, 343(6168):254-255]

Cited: 2 times

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Bidirectional shifts in colony queen number in a socially polymorphic ant population.

Jessica Purcell, Michel Chapuisat,

The breeding system of social organisms affects many important aspects of social life. Some species vary greatly in the number of breeders per group, but the mechanisms and selective pressures contributing to the maintenance of this polymorphism in social structure remain poorly understood. Here, we take advantage of a genetic ... Read more >>

Evolution (Evolution; international journal of organic evolution)
[2013, 67(4):1169-1180]

Cited: 10 times

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Born to be bee, fed to be worker? The caste system of a primitively eusocial insect.

Nayuta Brand, Michel Chapuisat,

UNLABELLED: INTRODUCTION:Primitively eusocial halictid bees are excellent systems to study the origin of eusociality, because all individuals have retained the ancestral ability to breed independently. In the sweat bee Halictus scabiosae, foundresses overwinter, establish nests and rear a first brood by mass-provisioning each offspring with pollen and nectar. The mothers ... Read more >>

Front. Zool. (Frontiers in zoology)
[2012, 9(1):35]

Cited: 9 times

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No evidence for immune priming in ants exposed to a fungal pathogen.

Anabelle Reber, Michel Chapuisat,

There is accumulating evidence that invertebrates can acquire long-term protection against pathogens through immune priming. However, the range of pathogens eliciting immune priming and the specificity of the response remain unclear. Here, we tested if the exposure to a natural fungal pathogen elicited immune priming in ants. We found no ... Read more >>

PLoS ONE (PloS one)
[2012, 7(4):e35372]

Cited: 25 times

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Choosy moral punishers.

Christine Clavien, Colby J Tanner, Fabrice Clément, Michel Chapuisat,

The punishment of social misconduct is a powerful mechanism for stabilizing high levels of cooperation among unrelated individuals. It is regularly assumed that humans have a universal disposition to punish social norm violators, which is sometimes labelled "universal structure of human morality" or "pure aversion to social betrayal". Here we ... Read more >>

PLoS ONE (PloS one)
[2012, 7(6):e39002]

Cited: 1 time

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Evolution: plastic sociality in a sweat bee.

Michel Chapuisat,

How and why do bees become social? A transplant experiment shows that sweat bees can adopt a solitary or social lifestyle in response to their environment. ... Read more >>

Curr. Biol. (Current biology : CB)
[2010, 20(22):R977-9]

Cited: 6 times

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Inclusive fitness theory and eusociality.

Patrick Abbot, Jun Abe, John Alcock, Samuel Alizon, Joao A C Alpedrinha, Malte Andersson, Jean-Baptiste Andre, Minus van Baalen, Francois Balloux, Sigal Balshine, Nick Barton, Leo W Beukeboom, Jay M Biernaskie, Trine Bilde, Gerald Borgia, Michael Breed, Sam Brown, Redouan Bshary, Angus Buckling, Nancy T Burley, Max N Burton-Chellew, Michael A Cant, Michel Chapuisat, Eric L Charnov, Tim Clutton-Brock, Andrew Cockburn, Blaine J Cole, Nick Colegrave, Leda Cosmides, Iain D Couzin, Jerry A Coyne, Scott Creel, Bernard Crespi, Robert L Curry, Sasha R X Dall, Troy Day, Janis L Dickinson, Lee Alan Dugatkin, Claire El Mouden, Stephen T Emlen, Jay Evans, Regis Ferriere, Jeremy Field, Susanne Foitzik, Kevin Foster, William A Foster, Charles W Fox, Juergen Gadau, Sylvain Gandon, Andy Gardner, Michael G Gardner, Thomas Getty, Michael A D Goodisman, Alan Grafen, Rick Grosberg, Christina M Grozinger, Pierre-Henri Gouyon, Darryl Gwynne, Paul H Harvey, Ben J Hatchwell, Jürgen Heinze, Heikki Helantera, Ken R Helms, Kim Hill, Natalie Jiricny, Rufus A Johnstone, Alex Kacelnik, E Toby Kiers, Hanna Kokko, Jan Komdeur, Judith Korb, Daniel Kronauer, Rolf Kümmerli, Laurent Lehmann, Timothy A Linksvayer, Sébastien Lion, Bruce Lyon, James A R Marshall, Richard McElreath, Yannis Michalakis, Richard E Michod, Douglas Mock, Thibaud Monnin, Robert Montgomerie, Allen J Moore, Ulrich G Mueller, Ronald Noë, Samir Okasha, Pekka Pamilo, Geoff A Parker, Jes S Pedersen, Ido Pen, David Pfennig, David C Queller, Daniel J Rankin, Sarah E Reece, Hudson K Reeve, Max Reuter, Gilbert Roberts, Simon K A Robson, Denis Roze, Francois Rousset, Olav Rueppell, Joel L Sachs, Lorenzo Santorelli, Paul Schmid-Hempel, Michael P Schwarz, Tom Scott-Phillips, Janet Shellmann-Sherman, Paul W Sherman, David M Shuker, Jeff Smith, Joseph C Spagna, Beverly Strassmann, Andrew V Suarez, Liselotte Sundström, Michael Taborsky, Peter Taylor, Graham Thompson, John Tooby, Neil D Tsutsui, Kazuki Tsuji, Stefano Turillazzi, Francisco Ubeda, Edward L Vargo, Bernard Voelkl, Tom Wenseleers, Stuart A West, Mary Jane West-Eberhard, David F Westneat, Diane C Wiernasz, Geoff Wild, Richard Wrangham, Andrew J Young, David W Zeh, Jeanne A Zeh, Andrew Zink,

Arising from M. A. Nowak, C. E. Tarnita & E. O. Wilson 466, 1057-1062 (2010); Nowak et al. reply. Nowak et al. argue that inclusive fitness theory has been of little value in explaining the natural world, and that it has led to negligible progress in explaining the evolution of ... Read more >>

Nature (Nature)
[2011, 471(7339):E1-4; author reply E9-10]

Cited: 92 times

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Social evolution: sick ants face death alone.

Michel Chapuisat,

Social insects not only live altruistically, they die so: a new study reveals that moribund ants abandon their nests to die in seclusion, which reduces the risk of transmitting diseases to relatives. ... Read more >>

Curr. Biol. (Current biology : CB)
[2010, 20(3):R104-5]

Cited: 6 times

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Longevity differs among sexes but is not affected by repeated immune activation in voles (Microtus arvalis)

DEVEVEY, CHAPUISAT, CHRISTE,

Investment of resources in immune defences, despite obvious short-term benefits, may be detrimental to long-term maintenance and thus decrease longevity in absence of parasites. In addition, females and males may differ in immune investment and intrinsic longevity because they are subjected to different degrees of sexual competition and extrinsic mortality. ... Read more >>

Biol. J. Linn. Soc. Lond. (Biological journal of the Linnean Society. Linnean Society of London)
[2009, 97(2):328-333]

Cited: 1 time

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Genetic clusters and sex-biased gene flow in a unicolonial Formica ant.

Barbara Holzer, Laurent Keller, Michel Chapuisat,

BACKGROUND:Animal societies are diverse, ranging from small family-based groups to extraordinarily large social networks in which many unrelated individuals interact. At the extreme of this continuum, some ant species form unicolonial populations in which workers and queens can move among multiple interconnected nests without eliciting aggression. Although unicoloniality has been ... Read more >>

BMC Evol. Biol. (BMC evolutionary biology)
[2009, 9:69]

Cited: 16 times

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